Linseed in chicken feed increases omega-3 in eggs

You are what you eat and the same goes for chickens!  Linseed (flax) oil and ground linseed in the diet of hens and bantams increases levels of omega-3 in meat and eggs.  If you aren’t eating eggs from chickens fed with high levels of omega-3 (to compensate for all the omega-6 rich maize and grains in their feed) you should eat a little linseed oil for every egg you eat to ensure you have a healthy balance of omega-3 to omega-6. You feed chickens with cold-pressed linseed oil so they get the omega-3 ALA, alpha-linolenic acid. of which they convert some (you and chickens need both long and hort chain omega-3) into the longer chain fatty acids; they the lay eggs rich in all these essential omega-3 fatty acids LA, linolenic acid, EPA, Eicosapentaenoic acid and DHA, Docosahexaenoic acid. The two long chain fatty acids are exactly the omega-3 you get in fish oils.  Well done chickens and linseed!

Cold-pressed linseed oil for chickens use Flax Farm linseed oil for horses and dogs

Linseed oil and ground linseed for shining plumage and resistance to scaly leg

Linseed (flaxseed) in the diet of chickens has been known for many years to give beautiful shining plumage. From experience at Sedgwick it has show there is improved resistance to scaly leg from bird fed linseed oil. Presumably omega-3 gives them a more natural balance of essential fatty acids and improves their immune system.

Millefleur, spangled, mottled Wyandotte bantams

Wyandottes are a traditional breed of poultry.  At Sedgwick hens and bantams a wide selection of recently developed strains of Wyandotte bantams, along with partridge and silver pencilled Wyandotte are bred as a hobby and for show. These chickens have been happily trialing Flax Farm linseed oil in their feed for ten years. I am pleased to say they are happy, vigorous and healthy.

Find out more about feeding linseed to hens and dogs

Chocolate mottled Wyandotte bantam hens
Chocolate mottled Wyandotte bantam hens

Or to buy beautiful Wyandotte chickens to lay you omega-3 eggs: see the Sedgwick Common website.